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Lauren Boebert (Republican Party) is a member of the U.S. House, representing Colorado’s 3rd Congressional District. She assumed office on January 3, 2021. Her current term ends on January 3, 2025.

Boebert (Republican Party) is running for election to the U.S. House to represent Colorado’s 4th Congressional District. She declared candidacy for the Republican primary scheduled on June 25, 2024.

Boebert also ran for re-election to the U.S. House to represent Colorado’s 3rd Congressional District. She will not appear on the ballot for the Republican primary on June 25, 2024.

On December 27, 2023, Boebert announced she was withdrawing her candidacy for Colorado’s 3rd Congressional District and re-filing to run in Colorado’s 4th Congressional District.[1]

Biography

Lauren Boebert was born in Altamonte Springs, Florida, and lives in Rifle, Colorado.[2] Boebert’s career experience includes working as a natural gas product technician and owning and operating Shooters Grill.[3]

Committee assignments

U.S. House

2023-2024

Boebert was assigned to the following committees:[Source]

  • Committee on Natural Resources
  • Energy and Mineral Resources
  • Water, Oceans, and Wildlife
  • Committee on Oversight and Accountability
  • Economic Growth, Energy Policy, and Regulatory Affairs
  • Government Operations and the Federal Workforce

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2021-2022

Boebert was assigned to the following committees:[Source]

  • Committee on Natural Resources
  • Water, Oceans, and Wildlife
  • Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States
  • House Committee on Budget

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Key votes

See also: Key votes

Ballotpedia monitors legislation that receives a vote and highlights the ones that we consider to be key to understanding where elected officials stand on the issues. To read more about how we identify key votes, click here.

Key votes: 117th Congress, 2021-2023

The 117th United States Congress began on January 3, 2021 and ended on January 3, 2023. At the start of the session, Democrats held the majority in the U.S. House of Representatives (222-213), and the U.S. Senate had a 50-50 makeup. Democrats assumed control of the Senate on January 20, 2021, when President Joe Biden (D) and Vice President Kamala Harris (D), who acted as a tie-breaking vote in the chamber, assumed office. We identified the key votes below using Congress’ top-viewed bills list and through marquee coverage of certain votes on Ballotpedia.

Key votes: 117th Congress, 2021-2023 Vote Bill and description Status Nay Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (H.R. 3684) was a federal infrastructure bill passed by the 117th Congress and signed into law by President Joe Biden (D) on November 15, 2021. Among other provisions, the bill provided funding for new infrastructure projects and reauthorizations, Amtrak maintenance and development, bridge repair, replacement, and rehabilitation, clean drinking water, high-speed internet, and clean energy transmission and power infrastructure upgrades. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[4]Click here to read more. Passed (228-206) Nay American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 The American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (H.R. 1319) was a bill passed by the 117th Congress and signed into law by President Joe Biden (D) on March 11, 2021, to provide economic relief in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Key features of the bill included funding for a national vaccination program and response, funding to safely reopen schools, distribution of $1,400 per person in relief payments, and extended unemployment benefits. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[5]Click here to read more. Passed (220-210) Nay Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 The Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 (H.R. 5376) was a bill passed by the 117th Congress and signed into law by President Joe Biden (D) on August 16, 2022, to address climate change, healthcare costs, and tax enforcement. Key features of the bill included a $369 billion investment to address energy security and climate change, an extension of Affordable Care Act subsidies, allowing Medicare to negotiate certain drug prices, a 15% corporate minimum tax, a 1% stock buyback fee, and enhanced Internal Revenue Service (IRS) enforcement, and an estimated $300 billion deficit reduction from 2022-2031. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[6]Click here to read more. Passed (220-207) Nay Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act The Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act (H.R. 3617) was a bill approved by the House of Representatives that sought to decriminalize marijuana, establish studies of legal marijuana sales, tax marijuana imports and production, and establish a process to expunge and review federal marijuana offenses. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[7] Passed (220-204) Nay For the People Act of 2021 The For the People Act of 2021 (H.R. 1) was a federal election law and government ethics bill approved by the House of Representatives. The Congressional Research Service said the bill would “expand voter registration (e.g., automatic and same-day registration) and voting access (e.g., vote-by-mail and early voting). It [would also limit] removing voters from voter rolls. … Further, the bill [would address] campaign finance, including by expanding the prohibition on campaign spending by foreign nationals, requiring additional disclosure of campaign-related fundraising and spending, requiring additional disclaimers regarding certain political advertising, and establishing an alternative campaign funding system for certain federal offices.” The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[8]Click here to read more. Passed (220-210) Nay Assault Weapons Ban of 2022 The Assault Weapons Ban of 2022 (H.R. 1808) was a bill passed by the House of Representatives that sought to criminalize the knowing import, sale, manufacture, transfer, or possession of semiautomatic assault weapons (SAW) or large capacity ammunition feeding devices (LCAFD). The bill made exemptions for grandfathered SAWs and LCAFDs. It required a simple majority vote in the House.[9] Passed (217-213) Yea National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2022 The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2022 (S. 1605) was a bill passed by the 117th Congress and signed into law by President Joe Biden (D) on December 27, 2021, authorizing Department of Defense acitivities and programs for fiscal year 2022. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[10] Passed (363-70) Yea James M. Inhofe National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2023 The James M. Inhofe National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2023 (H.R. 7776) was a bill passed by the 117th Congress and signed into law by President Joe Biden (D) on December 23, 2022, authorizing Department of Defense activities and programs for fiscal year 2023. The bill required a 2/3 majority in the House to suspend rules and pass the bill as amended.[11] Passed (350-80) Nay American Dream and Promise Act of 2021 The American Dream and Promise Act of 2021 (H.R. 6) was an immigration bill approved by the House of Representatives that proposed a path to permanent residence status for unauthorized immigrants eligible for Temporary Protected Status or Deferred Enforced Departure, among other immigration-related proposals. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[12] Passed (228-197) Nay Sergeant First Class Heath Robinson Honoring our Promise to Address Comprehensive Toxics Act of 2022 The Sergeant First Class Heath Robinson Honoring our Promise to Address Comprehensive Toxics Act of 2022 (S. 3373) was a bill passed by the 117th Congress and signed into law by President Joe Biden (D) on August 10, 2022, that sought to address healthcare access, the presumption of service-connection, and research, resources, and other matters related to veterans who were exposed to toxic substances during military service. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[13] Passed (342-88) Nay Chips and Science Act The Chips and Science Act (H.R. 4346) was a bill approved by the 117th Congress and signed into law by President Joe Biden (D) on August 9, 2022, which sought to fund domestic production of semiconductors and authorized various federal science agency programs and activities. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[14] Passed (243-187) Nay Women’s Health Protection Act of 2021 The Women’s Health Protection Act of 2021 (H.R. 3755) was a bill passed by the House of Representatives. The bill proposed prohibiting governmental restrictions on the provision of and access to abortion services and prohibiting governments from issuing some other abortion-related restrictions. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[15] Passed (218-211) Not Voting SAFE Banking Act of 2021 The SAFE Banking Act of 2021 (H.R. 1996) was a bill passed by the House of Representatives that proposed prohibiting federal regulators from penalizing banks for providing services to legitimate cannabis-related businesses and defining proceeds from such transactions as not being proceeds from unlawful activity, among other related proposals. Since the House moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill in an expedited process, it required a two-thirds majority vote in the House.[16] Passed (321-101) Nay Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2022 The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2022 (H.R. 2471) was a bill passed by the 117th Congress and signed into law by President Joe Biden (D) on March 15, 2022, providing for the funding of federal agencies for the remainder of 2022, providing funding for activities related to Ukraine, and modifying or establishing various programs. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[17] Passed (260-171) Not Voting Equality Act The Equality Act (H.R. 5) was a bill approved by the House of Representatives that proposed prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity in areas including public accommodations and facilities, education, federal funding, employment, housing, credit, and the jury system, among other related proposals. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[18] Passed (224-206) Nay Respect for Marriage Act The Respect for Marriage Act (H.R. 8404) was a bill passed by the 117th Congress and signed into law by President Joe Biden (D) on December 13, 2022. The bill codified the recognition of marriages between individuals of the same sex and of different races, ethnicities, or national origins, and provided that the law would not impact religious liberty or conscience protections, or provide grounds to compel nonprofit religious organizations to recognize same-sex marriages. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[19]Click here to read more. Passed (258-169) Nay Continuing Appropriations and Ukraine Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2023 The Continuing Appropriations and Ukraine Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2023 (H.R. 6833) was a bill approved by the 117th Congress and signed into law by President Joe Biden (D) on September 30, 2022. It provided for some fiscal year 2023 appropriations, supplemental funds for Ukraine, and extended several other programs and authorities. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[20] Passed (230-201) Nay Consumer Fuel Price Gouging Prevention Act The Consumer Fuel Price Gouging Prevention Act (H.R. 7688) was a bill approved by the House of Representatives that sought to prohibit individuals from selling consumer fuels at excessive prices during a proclaimed energy emergency. It would have also required the Federal Trade Commission to investigate whether the price of gasoline was being manipulated. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[21] Passed (217-207) Nay Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2021 The Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2021 (H.R. 8) was a bill approved by the House of Representatives that sought to prohibit the transfer of firearms between private parties unless a licensed firearm vendor conducted a background check on the recipient. The bill also provided for certain exceptions to this requirement. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[22] Passed (227-203) Nay Freedom to Vote: John R. Lewis Act The Freedom to Vote: John R. Lewis Act was a federal elections bill approved by the House of Representatives and voted down by the Senate in a failed cloture vote that sought to, among other provisions, make Election Day a public holiday, allow for same-day voter registration, establish minimum early voting periods, and allow absentee voting for any reason, restrict the removal of local election administrators in federal elections, regulate congressional redistricting, expand campaign finance disclosure rules for some organizations, and amend the Voting Rights Act to require some states to obtain clearance from the U.S. Department of Justice before implementing new election laws. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[23]Click here to read more. Passed (220-203) Nay Bipartisan Safer Communities Act The Bipartisan Safer Communities Act (S. 2938) was a firearm regulation and mental health bill passed by the 117th Congress and signed into law by President Joe Biden (D) on June 25, 2022. Provisions of the bill included expanding background checks for individuals under the age of 21, providing funding for mental health services, preventing individuals who had been convicted of a domestic violence misdemeanor or felony in dating relationships from purchasing firearms for five years, providing funding for state grants to implement crisis intervention order programs, and providing funding for community-based violence prevention initiatives. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[24]Click here to read more. Passed (234-193) Nay Impeaching Donald John Trump, President of the United States, for high crimes and misdemeanors. This was a resolution before the 117th Congress setting forth an article of impeachment saying that Donald Trump (R) incited an insurrection against the government of the United States on January 6, 2021. The House of Representatives approved the article of impeachment, and the Senate adjudged that Trump was not guilty of the charges. The article of impeachment required a simple majority vote in the House.[25]Click here to read more. Passed (232-197) Nay Electoral Count Reform and Presidential Transition Improvement Act of 2022 The Electoral Count Reform and Presidential Transition Improvement Act was a bill passed by the 117th Congress in the form of an amendment to a year-end omnibus funding bill that was signed into law by President Joe Biden (D) on December 23, 2022. The bill changed the procedure for counting electoral votes outlined in the Electoral Count Act of 1887. Elements of the bill included specifying that the vice president’s role at the joint session of congress to count electoral votes is ministerial, raising the objection threshold at the joint session of congress to count electoral votes to one-fifth of the members of both the House of Representatives and the Senate, identifying governors as the single official responsible for submitting the certificate of ascertainment identifying that state’s electors, and providing for expedited judicial review of certain claims about states’ certificates identifying their electors. The bill required a simple majority vote in the House.[26]Click here to read more. Passed (225-201)

Elections

2024

See also: Colorado’s 4th Congressional District election, 2024

General election

The primary will occur on June 25, 2024. The general election will occur on November 5, 2024. Additional general election candidates will be added here following the primary.

Democratic primary election

Republican primary election

Withdrawn or disqualified candidates

  • Ken Buck (R)

Endorsements

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2024

See also: Colorado’s 3rd Congressional District election, 2024

General election

The primary will occur on June 25, 2024. The general election will occur on November 5, 2024. Additional general election candidates will be added here following the primary.

Democratic primary election

Withdrawn or disqualified candidates

  • Debby Burnett (D)

Republican primary election

Withdrawn or disqualified candidates

  • Lauren Boebert (R)

Endorsements

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2022

See also: Colorado’s 3rd Congressional District election, 2022

General election

Democratic primary election

Withdrawn or disqualified candidates

  • Donald Valdez (D)
  • Colin Buerger (D)
  • Colin Wilhelm (D)
  • Scott Yates (D)
  • Susan Martinez (D)
  • Kerry Donovan (D)
  • Gregg Smith (D)
  • Naziha In’am Hadil (D)
  • Debby Burnett (D)
  • Kellie Rhodes (D)

Republican primary election

Withdrawn or disqualified candidates

  • Marina Zimmerman (R)

2020

See also: Colorado’s 3rd Congressional District election, 2020

Colorado’s 3rd Congressional District election, 2020 (June 30 Democratic primary)

Colorado’s 3rd Congressional District election, 2020 (June 30 Republican primary)

General election

Withdrawn or disqualified candidates

  • Robert Moser (Independent)

Democratic primary election

Withdrawn or disqualified candidates

  • Root Routledge (D)
  • Donald Valdez (D)

Republican primary election

Libertarian convention

Unity Party convention

Campaign themes

2024

Ballotpedia survey responses

See also: Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection

Lauren Boebert has not yet completed Ballotpedia’s 2024 Candidate Connection survey. Send a message to Lauren Boebert asking her to fill out the survey. If you are Lauren Boebert, click here to fill out Ballotpedia’s 2024 Candidate Connection survey.

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You can ask Lauren Boebert to fill out this survey by using the buttons below or emailing [email protected].

2024

Ballotpedia survey responses

See also: Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection

Lauren Boebert did not complete Ballotpedia’s 2024 Candidate Connection survey.

2022

Lauren Boebert did not complete Ballotpedia’s 2022 Candidate Connection survey.

2020

Campaign website

Boebert’s campaign website stated the following:

Notable endorsements

See also: Ballotpedia: Our approach to covering endorsements

This section displays endorsements this individual made in elections within Ballotpedia’s coverage and endorsements scopes.

Noteworthy events

Electoral vote certification on January 6-7, 2021

See also: Counting of electoral votes (January 6-7, 2021)

Congress convened a joint session on January 6-7, 2021, to count electoral votes by state and confirm the results of the 2020 presidential election. Boebert voted against certifying the electoral votes from Arizona and Pennsylvania. The House rejected both objections by a vote of 121-303 for Arizona and 138-282 for Pennsylvania.

Personal

Boebert and her husband, Jayson, have four sons.[29]

See also

External links

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Footnotes

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About Author

Kay Adams